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  • Camp Casey, South Korea

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UNITED STATES ARMY GARRISON AREA I/2D INFANTRY DIVISION ARMY COMMUNITY SERVICE UNIT #15543 APO AP 96224-0453

Location........................ : NORTHWESTERN SOUTH KOREA

Major Command................... : 2D INFANTRY DIVISION

Area I and the 2d Infantry Division (2ID) area is a non-command sponsored area located in the North western section of the Republic of Korea. Located within this area of approximately 700 square miles are 42 installations/compounds. All soldiers arriving in this area are processed through the Warrior Replacement Company. Further assignments are made at that time. All soldiers are assigned to single soldier housing (non-command sponsored area). There are no, repeat NO government family quarters available in this area.

There are a few command sponsored positions within this command. There are no family quarters available and those personnel that are authorized to bring family members usually are authorized quarters at Yongsan or, in some cases Rent Plus. Civilians that are command sponsored or state-side hires are authorized Living Quarters Allowance (LQA).

* AREA I HISTORY

The Area I Support Activity (Provisional) was formed to assume the Base Operations Support (BASOPS) and quality of life missions from the 501st Corps Support Group. Area I enhances the capabilities of war fighters by allowing them to remain mission focused and continually improves the quality of life of all soldiers, civilians, and family members throughout the command.

Area I West was activated on 12 June 1995. On that day, Colonel Shawn F. Graves, then commander of the United States Army Garrison (USAG) at Camp Casey, assumed command of the organization. By 1 October 1995, Area I West had completely assumed the BASOPS mission for the 41 separate installations distributed throughout Area I West's two subordinate commands, United States Army Garrison at Camp Casey and Camp Red Cloud. The Headquarters Company for Area I West was established on November 1, 1995. With the addition of Camp Page on 13 June 1996, the command was redesignated as Area I Support Activity.

Today, Area I continues to provide BASOPS and quality of life support to more than 20,000 soldiers and nearly 6,000 civilians stationed at 42 camps North of Seoul and stands ready to conduct Noncombatant Evacuation Operations during transition to hostilities or natural disasters.

* 2D INFANTRY DIVISION HISTORY

Camp Casey was named and officially dedicated in 1952 in memory of Maj. Hugh B. Casey, who died in a plane crash here in December 1951.

Casey arrived in Korea in 1951, a Second Lieutenant, and served as a company commander in the 2nd Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division. He received the Distinguished Service Cross, the nation's second highest award for valor, for heroism at the Hungnam beachhead.

According to Lt. Col. Roy E. Lewis, then executive officer of the 7th Infantry Division Support Command, Casey was ordered to have his company in a blocking position west of Hungnam by sunrise the next morning. He had to cross a mountain pass with two to three feet of snow in it. Forcemarching his men, he had them only halfway to the objective by sunrise. He pressed forward, refusing to give up despite the fatigue and hopelessness of the mission. He didn't stop marching until ordered to.

To Lewis, this was what made Casey an extraordinary soldier. "He gave little thought to himself," Lewis said.

Later, while he was serving as senior aide to Maj. Gen. Williston B. Palmer, then Commanding General of the 3rd Inf. Div., Casey's light observation plane was hit by ground fire. The plane crashed just west of the present 2nd Infantry Division headquarters. A white wooden cross was erected to mark the spot; it was replaced in 1960 by a white concrete cross. "Lest we forget," the cross and camp now mark the memory of a brave man.

Soldiers coming to the 2nd Infantry Division can look forward to serving in the most combat ready, most forward deployed division in America's Army, one that works closely with its Korean allies to keep the peace on freedom's frontier.

The Warrior Division faces a real threat. One of the largest armies in the world sits just across the Demilitarized Zone(DMZ). The fighting stopped in 1953, but the Korean War never officially ended. North Korea's leaders remain committed to uniting the peninsula under their regime, and will take advantage of any erosion of the division's readiness.

Being combat ready means many things: excellent training, leadership, equipment and professional support. Warrior division leaders bring all these things together in a training program that is well-planned, tough, and realistic.

Tough training keeps warriors busy during their stay, but there is more to a tour in the 2nd Inf. Div. than the mission. Quality of life has been, and will remain, a priority in the Warrior Division. Many new barracks facilities have been constructed over the past few years, and construction continues. New clubs have been built, and many existing facilities completely renovated. The Army and Air Force Exchange System and commercial fast food restaurants have opened the door to more dining choices. The information superhighway is also coming to freedom's frontier: cable Television installation is in the final installation process, and there are plans to bring Internet access to soldiers with the equipment to take advantage of it. Soldiers can also continue their education, often using the creative and flexible programs designed to work around a Warrior's schedule.

There is much to learn outside the classroom--and the gate. During a one-year tour in Korea, soldiers get an opportunity to enjoy a country with a rich and diverse culture and a unique geography. Ancient traditions continue to flourish in a nation that has rapidly become a modern industrial and economic power. Soldiers can take advantage of regularly scheduled tours to local attractions, such as the Folk Village in Suwon, Mount Sorak, the DMZ, Buddhist temples, and many famous shopping areas. Those who take an interest in their surroundings find their tours much more satisfying.

Despite the fact virtually all the division's 13,000 soldiers serve one-year, unaccompanied tours, families are also part of the 2nd Inf. Div. About 3,000 family members choose to live in Korea while their warriors serve here. The division does not directly sponsor these families, but does care very much about and has programs to help them adjust to life in Korea. The "Pear Blossom Cottages," located throughout the division, are an extension of the Army Community Service relocation, outreach and family advocacy programs. The cottages imitate "American-style" houses and offer American spouses a bit of home in a foreign land, while at the same time exposing Korean-born and other Third Country Spouses to American culture.

This information has just scratched the surface of what it means to serve with the most combat ready, most forward deployed division in America's Army. Soldiers who come here ready to fight and serve will find an assignment to the 2nd Inf. Div. can be the most rewarding of a soldier's career, truly SECOND TO NONE!

MISSION: The Second Infantry Division's mission is to deter war. Should deterrence fail, the soldiers of the Warrior Division stand shoulder-to-shoulder with their Korean allies, ready to defend "freedom's frontier."

CAPABILITIES: Unique force structure and fighting capability not found anywhere else in the US Army or on the Korean peninsula. The Warrior Division possesses more combat power than any other division within the coalition forces.

The 2nd Inf. Div. is the most forward deployed, lethal and combat ready division in the US Army.

The 2nd Inf. Div. is a robust, combined arms team that contains armor, mechanized infantry, air assault infantry and combat aviation units.

The 1st and 2nd Brigades are the maneuver brigades, and have a total of two M1A1 Abrams tank battalions, two Mechanized Infantry battalions (Bradley) and two air assault infantry battalions.

Other major commands are the Aviation Brigade, the Division Artillery, the Engineer Brigade, and the Division Support Command.

The Division Artillery (DIVARTY) is the largest in the Army and contains more Multiple-Launched Rocket Systems (MLRS) than any other DIVARTY.

The Division boasts top quality soldiers and leaders--both American and Korean--who are equipped with the best equipment in the world to include the M1A1 Abrams tank, the M2/3 Bradley Infantry Fighting Vehicle, the AH66 Apache helicopter and the MLRS.

TRAINING: From rifle marksmanship, to tank gunnery, to delivering the devastating fire of the divisional MLRS, the combat readiness of the Warrior Division's soldiers and equipment is its number one priority.

Computer simulation plays a large role in leader and battle staff training. The division periodically conducts a five-day Warfighter exercise at Camp Casey and Camp Hovey.

Contributing to the division's combat readiness and its ability to team with its Korean allies are the division's Korean Augmentation to the United States Army, or KATUSA soldiers. More than 2,000 KATUSA soldiers are fully integrated into the division's force structure. They serve as tank crew members, artillerymen, administrative specialists and cooks. They are fellow warriors.

FACILITIES AND MANPOWER: The 15,000 Warriors of the 2nd Inf. Div. are spread across 17 different installations throughout the northwestern quadrant of South Korea. The headquarters is located at Camp Red Cloud in the city of Uijongbu. The bulk of the troops are stationed at Camps Casey and Hovey near Tongduchun. The remaining 14 camps have smaller concentrations of combat and support units.

"In front of them all" stands the 1st Battalion, 506th Inf. Regiment, located north of Freedom Bridge and the Imjin River, a scant two kilometers from the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ).

The division is in the midst of a major construction and renovation campaign designed to improve the quality of life of our soldiers. By the end of Fiscal Year 1999, more than 30 new barracks construction projects are to be completed. In the last year, new recreational and dining facilities, such as the Borderline Cafe and brigade "Super Dayrooms" have been built to provide soldiers a better living environment.

A newly built air assault training facility, located between Camps Casey and Hovey, just recently trained and graduated more than 80 new air assault qualified Warriors. The school is the first of its kind built and run overseas.

POPULATION ASSIGNED SERVED:13,073

- US MILITARY: 9,284 - DOD CIVILIANS: 75 - KATUSA: 1,208 - KOREAN NATIONALS: 611 - FAMILY MEMBERS: 422 - OTHER: 1,473

* CAMP RED CLOUD HISTORY

Camp Red Cloud, formerly known as Camp Jackson, was named in honor of Cpl. Red Cloud on Armed Forces Day, May 18, 1957.

Cpl. Mitchell Red Cloud Jr. Born July 2, 1924 in Hatfield, Wisconsin, Corporal Mitchell Red Cloud Jr. was killed in heroic action during the Korean War on November 5, 1950. An American Indian who also served in World War II as a Marine, he is buried in the Indian Mission Cemetery located near Black River Falls, Wisconsin. On April 25, 1951, Army Chief of Staff, J. Lawton Collins signed General Order No. 26 that posthumously awarded Cpl. Red Cloud the Medal of Honor.

CRC covers over 164 acres of land in the northwestern edge of Uijongbu City. Camp Red Cloud is located between Seoul and the DMZ. This small post is home to 1700 U.S. Soldiers, 112 U.S. Airman, and 240 KATUSA Soldiers, and employs 83 U.S. civilians, and 430 Korean workers. The major Unit Commands are Area I Support Activity, 501st Support Group (Corps), 122d Signal Bn, and HHC, 2d Infantry Division.

Korea enjoys the popular motto, "The Land of the Morning Calm" Welcome to the "Land of the Morning Calm."

POPULATION ASSIGNED SERVED: 2,832

- US MILITARY: 1,723 - DOD CIVILIANS: 83 - KATUSA: 243 - KOREAN NATIONALS: 438 - FAMILY MEMBERS: 132 - OTHER: 213

* CAMP STANLEY HISTORY

1955: Opened as unnamed Tent City, 11th EN BN, 7th ID 1957: 36th EN BDE moved to Tent City-Named after CDR, COL Stanley 1958: Construction started on first buildings 1969: 7th ID moved to Stanley from Paju (the DMZ area) 1971: 7th ID DIVARTY redesignated 2d ID DIVARTY 1976: 4/7 CAV replaced 117 AVN CO 1988: AOE movement, 2nd CAB replaces 4/7 CAV

POPULATION ASSIGNED SERVED: 2,432

- US MILITARY: 1,850 - DOD CIVILIANS: 17 - KATUSA: 229 - KOREAN NATIONALS: 83 - FAMILY MEMBERS: 100 - OTHER: 153

* CAMP HOWZE HISTORY

Camp Howze is located approzimately 30 minutes from the truce Village of Panmunjom where the Armistice was signed on 27 July, 1953 to stop the fighting of the Korean War.

POPULATION ASSIGNED SERVED: 651

- US MILITARY: 322 - DOD CIVILIANS: 3 - KATUSA: 114 - KOREAN NATIONALS: 63 - FAMILY MEMBERS: 40 - OTHER: 109

* CAMP PAGE HISTORY

Camp Page is named in honor of Lieutenant Colonel John U.D. Page, United States Army, who was posthumously awarded the congressional medal of honor and the Navy Cross for Gallantry while serving with Marine units during the breakout from bloody Chosen reservoir in 1950.

Realizing the extreme danger to the stationary convoy while under relentless fire of the enemy forces commanding high ground on both sides of the road, Lieutenant Colonel Page bravely fought his way to the head of the column accompanied by a marine private. Undaunted by point-blank machine-gun fire, he continued directly into the hostiles strong point, taking 30 of the enemy completely by surprise and inflicting severe causalities among them. With the marine private wounded by a hand grenade, Lieutenant Colonel Page ordered him to withdraw and provided him with covering fire, fiercely continuing to engage the enemy single-handedly and killing 12 of them before he was mortally wounded. By his valiant and aggressive fighting spirit in the face of overwhelming odds during this self-impose mission, he was directly responsible for disrupting the hostile attack, there by making it possible for the members of his convoy to regroup, redeploy and fight off succeeding attacks. His outstanding courage, self-sacrificing efforts and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Lieutenant Colonel Page and the United States Armed Forces. He gallantly gave his life for his country.

On 30 January 1958 the last units of the 100th Field Artillery Rocket Battalion arrived from Japan taking up headquarters at what is now known as Camp Page. Subsequently the battalion was joined by Infantry, Engineer, Signal and supply units and was redesigned the 4th Missile Command, a major subordinate command of the Eighth United States Army. The "Last of a Breed," the 4th Missile Command celebrated its 20th and final anniversary on 27 April 1978 and was totally inactivated in June 1978. Only the Weapons Support Detachment-Korea was retained to carry on the rites of ST. Barber, and it to was inactivated in September of 1990.

POPULATION ASSIGNED SERVED: 1,165

- US MILITARY: 628 - DOD CIVILIANS: 20 - KATUSA: 90 - KOREAN NATIONALS: 229 - FAMILY MEMBERS: 54 - OTHER: 144

*** POPULATION ASSIGNED SERVED AREA I/2ID: 26,458

- US MILITARY: 17,518 - DOD CIVILIANS: 283 - KATUSA: 2,615 - KOREAN NATIONALS: 2,355 - FAMILY MEMBERS: 864 - OTHER: 2,823

Base Operator
011-82-31-869-1110

Major Units
501st Support Group
1st BN
15th Field Artilery
2nd MP Company

Billeting/Quarters
Camp Red Cloud
DSN: 732-6377
011-82-31-870-6377

Mailing Address
Area I Support Activity, IMKO-AA-MWA
APO, AP
96224-9998

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